Alzheimer’s is a progressive disorder of the brain that causes the cells in the brain to waste away and eventually die.

What are the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease?

The most visible sign of Alzheimer’s decline is memory loss. Despite it being normal to have occasional memory lapses and short-term memory loss, a person with Alzheimer’s disease has early signs of often forgetting conversations and recent events. This worsens as the diagnosis of the condition worsens, and memory care will be required.

Symptoms associated with memory loss include:

  • Forgetting appointments and agreements with no chance of remembering later
  • Misplacing objects and storing them in illogical places
  • Losing track of where the person is even in familiar areas
  • Forgetting the right words to call objects and forgetting the names of everyday people like family members
  • Difficulty with typical problem-solving skills, activities of daily living, and social interaction

Problems with concentration and thinking can also characterize Alzheimer’s disease and stages of memory loss. Memory impairment may be worse when multitasking. As the disease advances, the person may fail to distinguish numbers and perform simple math. Decisions and judgment by a person with Alzheimer’s may be awkward. For instance, a person with Alzheimer’s can wear a winter coat on a sunny, summer morning. The disease also affects the behavior and mood of the individual.

The person may show signs of:

  • Apathy
  • Social withdrawal
  • Inhibition loss
  • Delusions, such as believing a theft has taken place while it hasn’t
  • Sleeping disorders
  • Depression
  • Lack of trust

Eventually, the person with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease may forget fundamental tasks like bathing, dressing, and eating. At advanced stages, these symptoms are accompanied by vestibulodynia symptoms. Some deaths caused by Alzheimer’s disease have been due to the brain failing to note simple emergencies like dehydration.

 

How is dementia diagnosed, and is dementia a mental illness?

Apart from Alzheimer’s disease, other common types of dementia include Parkinson’s disease, vascular dementia, Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, multi-infarct dementia, Pick’s disease, and Lewy body dementia. Vascular dementia is a type of dementia that has been linked to the growth of the vestibular papillae in women. The vestibular papillae lead to a condition known as vestibular papillomatosis in the vulva.

Is dementia a mental illness? There is no one formulated test to check for a diagnosis of dementia and can be challenging to distinguish. Despite that, it is classified as a mental illness. The first method clinical researchers use for treatment for Alzheimer’s and dementia is the elimination method. This helps to check whether the person has an underlying condition that has dementia-like symptoms. Such conditions may include normal pressure hydrocephalus, an abnormal thyroid function, high blood pressure, or a vitamin deficiency.

dementia-like symptoms. Such conditions may include normal pressure hydrocephalus, an abnormal thyroid function, high blood pressure, or a vitamin deficiency.